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LGBTQIA+ and Bhutanese Community

Started by [email protected], May 24, 2022, 08:56 PM

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[email protected]

The topic of LGBTQIA+ is still not yet open in our community. It is still considered a taboo and comes with lots of stereotypes. Lot of our youths who identify themselves in the LGBTQIA+ community don't feel safe enough to be who they are. What are your observations around this topic? How can we create a safe space for these community members where they don't have to go through mental and emotional upheavals because of certain social norms and beliefs? How can we build a community where they feel home and belonged?

BTD

Quote from: [email protected] on May 24, 2022, 08:56 PMThe topic of LGBTQIA+ is still not yet open in our community. It is still considered a taboo and comes with lots of stereotypes. Lot of our youths who identify themselves in the LGBTQIA+ community don't feel safe enough to be who they are.

Why is this, Robin?

Is the "taboo" attitude you mention a generational thing or a cultural thing?

Are there any signs of changing attitudes?  And if so, are they softening or hardening?

And when you say the LGBTQIA+ community "doesn't feel safe enough to be who they are", what do you mean? Are you talking of physical threats or social rejection?

Do you have any examples (without mentioning names, of course)?
"The function of journalism is, primarily, to uncover vital new information in the public interest and to put that information in a context so that we can use it to improve the human condition", Joshua Oppenheimer

[email protected]

Taboo is both cultural and can be seen in as a general thing in other communities too.
In terms of changing attitudes, I guess we can see the energy move both sides: softening and hardening. I have seen folks being open about this conversation and at the same time I have also seen people being very hard on this.
There were some news report from Nepal where LGBTQIA+ community members had to go through physical threats. I guess mostly in the context of our community in US, it is more of social rejection, mental emotional challenges, peer rejections, etc.
Example: I work with LGBTQIA+ community in Vietnamese community and some young folks within the Bhutanese community, and I get to hear their stories and their experiences.

BTD

Quote from: [email protected] on May 25, 2022, 08:46 AMI get to hear their stories and their experiences.

Hi Robin,

Can you share any examples of those stories and experiences?
"The function of journalism is, primarily, to uncover vital new information in the public interest and to put that information in a context so that we can use it to improve the human condition", Joshua Oppenheimer

TP Mishra

Robin, you brought up an interesting topic for discussion. I think it's time that we accept and recognize those who ID themselves not typically 'male' or 'female'!

RP Subba

I thought these were issues that were rampant in developed western societies. The term itself is very new to me; having heard about LGBT issues only after coming to the US.

Back home, and in the camps, we were not aware, if such social issues existed in our community. To me, frankly, this discussion comes with an element of surprise.     

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